Maple Knoll Village


Annual Golf Outing invites community to take a swing in support of WMKV Radio Station

Awesome variety of Silent Auction Baskets at the WMKV Golf Outing!

Plans are underway for the 21st annual golf tournament benefiting WMKV 89.3 and 89.9 FM, a radio station located on the campus of Maple Knoll Village. The tournament is set to take place on Monday August 21st, 2017 at Maketewah Country Club in Cincinnati.

WMKV, the flagship station of Maple Knoll Communities, is a member-supported, educational, public radio broadcasting music from the 30’s, 40’s and 50’s and talk programming dealing with seniors, aging, and health. The station is accessed online and through the two radio signals at 89.3FM and 89.9FM (WLHS). They broadcast 24 hours a day, seven days a week and can now improve the lives of seniors and families around the world via internet streaming and smart phone apps.

WMKV serves as a companion to older adults and throughout the year strives to continue their mission of being a source of information for active seniors and families and a cultural lifeline to those who may not be ambulatory. Funds raised from the event help guarantee that programming will remain a constant presence in the lives of over 35,000 listeners.

“This annual event is a major fundraiser for WMKV,” shared WMKV Manager, George Zahn. “We are always thankful for the support we receive from our sponsors and players, who turn out year-after-year to enjoy a great day on the greens in support of our programing.”

The day begins with lunch at noon and a shotgun scramble at 1 p.m. The registration fee of $185 includes the greens fee for 18 holes of golf on the beautiful Maketewah Country Club course, a cart, boxed lunch, cocktails and a dinner reception with a silent auction.

Corporate, individual, and team sponsorship opportunities are available. There are various levels of sponsorship available ranging from $7,500 to $1,500. Supporters will be acknowledged in the day of program, on day of t-shirts, on Maple Knoll Communities websites, in appropriate media correspondence, announced during the event and listed as a contributor at registration tables. Donations are welcomed and appreciated.

Registration can be completed by calling the Maple Knoll Development Department at 513-782-8629.

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Maple Knoll Village residents show award winning talent

Maple Knoll Village, a continuing care retirement community in Springdale, is home to residents with a variety of incredible talents. Some of the residents showcase their creativity and talent in Leading Age Ohio’s annual art and writing show.

Leading Age Ohio includes nearly 300 nonprofit retirement organizations and service providers. The goal of Leading Age Ohio is to improve the quality of life for Ohio seniors that are cared for by their members. The annual art and writing show is one way Leading Age can do just that.

Maple Knoll Village residents jumped at the opportunity to creatively express themselves and 8 entries were submitted from the campus. Of these 8 entries 3 received awards!

Resident Nancy Cooley won first place with her poetry piece “Along the Beaver”. Jack Remington won first place in woven art with his piece titled “Summer’s Shadow Shawl”. Mary Lee Fay’s “Vegetable Wreath” piece won second place in the needle arts competition.

For more information on Maple Knoll Village’s art winners or Maple Knoll Village in general please call 513.782.2423.



Maple Knoll Village Honored 6 Star Award by The Springdale Board of Health

Each year The City of Springdale Health Department announces the select few food services that were able to achieve the Springdale 6 Star Honor Award. Maple Knoll Village, a continuing care retirement community in Springdale, is honored to once again achieve this award in 7 different locations!

This prestigious award honors Excellence in Food Safety by considering several factors including the results of routine health inspections and current food safety training. To earn this award the following criteria must be met: less than 2 Critical violations during routine Health Department inspections per license year, no follow up inspections / license year, no Smoke Free violations / license year, in good standing with other City of Springdale agencies, and have a valid food license according to the requirements of the Ohio Revised Code for one full license year and renewed license by due date. In addition, a few educational requirements must be met. These are that the individuals in charge must show proof of ServSafe Certification or equivalent food safety training.

Maple Knoll was given this coveted award in the following areas: Beecher Place Dining Room, Bodmann Pavilion Skilled Nursing’s 2nd, 3rd and 4th floors, Breese Manor Dining Room, The Main Street Café and The Manor House Restaurant. The Main Street Café and The Manor House Restaurant are both open to the public while the other areas cater to the dining needs of residents only.

For more information on Maple Knoll Village or how you can dine at one of these locations please call 513.782.2423.



Technology to the Rescue For Aging Populations

A villa on the campus of Maple Knoll Village, a continuing care retirement community in Springdale, has been transformed into a learning and test environment for the development of technologies aimed at keeping seniors in their own homes or communities longer.

Known as the Innovation Collaboratory House, the villa is a partnership between several University of Cincinnati (UC) colleges and Maple Knoll Village. It’s home to telehealth robots and patient simulators, and is now the testing ground for innovative student projects aimed at detecting falls, preventing medication errors and making life easier for an aging population.

UC and Maple Knoll Village hosted a public open house and ribbon cutting to showcase this innovative partnership and “smart” villa on Thursday, June 26, from 10 a.m. to noon, on the campus of Maple Knoll Village, 11100 Springfield Pike. Steve Wilson, chairman of the Maple Knoll Communities board, acted as emcee as Maple Knoll Village CEO Jim Formal and UC Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Beverly Davenport, PhD held a proclamation signing and formal ribbon cutting. Senators Eric Kearney and Bill Seitz were on hand to voice their support for this necessary project.

“An ever-growing population of older adults need health care,” says Jim Formal, CEO of Maple Knoll Village. “Every month, more than a quarter million Americans turn 65, and Ohio ranks sixth in the nation in the sheer size of this age population.

“It’s imperative that we develop technologies that allow people to age in their homes or communities for longer periods, leaving long-term care placement as a last resort.”

Debi Sampsel, who holds a doctor of nursing practice degree and is chief officer of innovation and entrepreneurship at the UC College of Nursing, has spearheaded the creation of the Innovation Collaboratory House. She says that without innovations like the ones being developed there through collaboration with UC’s colleges of nursing, medicine and engineering and applied science, Ohio Medicaid expenditures will consume half of the state budget by 2020 and continue to increase in subsequent years.

But aside from financial reasons, Sampsel agrees that, for many, aging in place can improve quality of life.

“We’ve all heard stories of family members and friends who believe their loved ones would have been better off if they were able to remain in their own homes or communities to live out their final years,” says Sampsel. “The Innovation Collaboratory House at Maple Knoll Village allows us to work directly with an aging population to find out what kinds of technologies would make aging in place a real possibility.”

But, Sampsel says, because aging in place isn’t a solution that will work for those with more serious health needs, the Innovation Collaboratory House also gives UC and Maple Knoll Village the opportunity to train future health care providers in the care of geriatric populations.

The UC Mascot snaps photos with guests at the event

The UC Mascot snaps photos with guests at the event


Projects currently under development at the Innovation Collaboratory House include:
•A fall detection system that uses technology many already have in their homes—the Microsoft X-Box “Kinect” video game system.
•The use of exoskeleton technology to assist the elderly with sitting and standing.
•Development of systems and sensors that monitor the opening and closing of things like refrigerators and even medication dispensers.

Nursing and medical students and residents are also using the on-site telehealth robots to train for a future of health care interactions that could take place via telehealth technologies.

UC and Maple Knoll Village have a 30-year history of working together in nursing, medicine and pharmacy education and practice.



Maple Knoll Warns of Heat Risks with Older Adults

After the winter that Cincinnati had we all are wanting to enjoy this nice weather! But did you know that summer heat kills more than any other type of weather?

It is also predicted that this summer’s temperatures will be higher than normal for Cincinnati. A federal study found that 40% of heat related deaths were in people aged 65 and older. In fact, the elderly have an increased risk for heat related problems such as dehydration, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke. There are many reasons this occurs such as the older body holds far less water than a younger one. The elderly have decreased thirst recognition and ability to sense temperature changes. Medicines can interfere with the ability to sweat which cools and individual off. Medicines also can increase urination which deplete fluids in the body.

Maple Knoll Village, a nonprofit continuing care retirement community in Springdale, knows how important it is to be informed on heat risks. Maple Knoll Risk Management Director Karen Pendleton even touched base with us to share some tips and things to look for this summer. Some common symptoms of dehydration include headache, dizziness, dry mouth, and sunken eyes. Those experiencing heat exhaustion often have muscle cramps, low blood pressure, rapid pulse and nausea. If someone is having a heat stroke they often have a body temperature of 104 or high, they could be having seizures, or loss of consciousness that could potentially lead to death.

To avoid these issues Karen recommends drinking plenty of water and always having water with you, stay in cool areas (such as your home, local mall, senior center, etc.), sit in front of a fan, mist yourself with water, save chores for later in the day as it is cooler, keep house shades and blinds closed, eat lighter meals and check in with family members regularly. If you are caring for an older loved one please check in with them frequently.
If someone is already experiencing these issues then take them to a cool area immediately. Loosen or remove clothing to help cool them and apply cold compresses to their neck, armpits and groin. Provide plenty of fluids and seek medical attention if necessary.

We encourage everyone to stay cool this summer! If you have questions on additional ways to stay safe during the summer months or on Maple Knoll Village please call 513.782.2423.



Maple Knoll Village Receives Funding for Skilled Nursing

The Robert and Christine Steinmann Family Foundation has awarded Maple Knoll Village $21,000 to purchase equipment that will help improve the lives of those living in skilled nursing at Maple Knoll Village.

The Robert and Christine Steinmann Family Foundation has a mission to help those in need help themselves through knowledge and resources that improve the quality of their lives and the lives of future generations. One particular focus of theirs is aid and medical care for the elderly and needy. The Robert and Christine Steinmann Family Foundation has a long history of supporting Maple Knoll Communities and were more generous than ever this year.

Maple Knoll staff reached out to the foundation to receive support for necessary items that help improve care for the elderly we serve. In particular, Maple Knoll was desperately in need of iPads for electronic medical records and new equipment in the Rehabilitation Center in skilled nursing. This center offered occupational, physical and speech therapy and new updates would allow for a smoother recovery for some.

In addition to the iPads these funds will be used to purchase wheelchairs and to create home like settings such as a kitchen and laundry room in the center. This will allow individuals to practice real life tasks in order for them to recover and live on their own once again. Without the generosity of The Robert and Christine Steinmann Family Foundation these additions would not be available to the clients at Maple Knoll.

Maple Knoll Communities is a non-profit home providing services including residential accommodations, assisted living, rehabilitation and skilled nursing care. As a nationally recognized leader in the care and support of older adults since 1848, Maple Knoll Communities, Inc. has offered innovative, holistic residential and community-based programs that improve the quality of life and respond to individuals’ changing needs as they age.
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Electronic Medical Records and Your Healthcare

In 2009, Congress enacted the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of which Title XIII is the HITECH Act or Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act. That is a mouthful. The goal is to create a nationwide network of electronic health records to enhance healthcare and reduce costs through better communication. Financial penalties will go into effect in 2015 for institutions and physician’s offices not in compliance that receive money from Medicare and Medicaid.

Behind the scenes a whole lot of data entry has been going on in healthcare to make this happen. The upside for the healthcare consumer, is that critical health information can be available 24/7 and much quicker than before. The downside is that years will be spent tweaking, updating, and evaluating these programs to ensure they are meeting the goals set. As a consumer of healthcare, there are things to know about this process and things you can contribute to make sure the electronic medical record works for you.

Each healthcare system has their own electronic record and they do not communicate with each other automatically. If you see a primary care physician with UC Health and go to a cardiologist with TriHealth and see an independent dermatologist, and then are admitted to a hospital in an emergency outside of either of those systems, the data in your medical record is in four different systems. Each system may think it has the correct picture of you and your needs.

The Electronic Medical Record is only as good as the data entry and the person entering the data. Errors can be made with the click of a button. Personal Example: After a visit to an emergency room, I found out that a local medical system has me listed as taking three prescription medications on an ongoing basis. I take none. A dermatologist office I visited ten months ago made a data entry error and did not specify in the record that these medications were to be taken for only 2 weeks. I was unable to get the emergency room to correct the record and the discharge papers told me to continue taking three medications that I do not take. No harm done, I know better. Had I been admitted, a physician would recognize these as 2 week kind of medications and would not have ordered them. A problem could have come up if a new medication was ordered that showed negative interaction with one of the “not taken” meds. A flag in the system would suggest a different medication be taken which might not be as therapeutic. It could then be ordered with a click of the button and no looking into the issue.

Here is an example of the most frequent problems we find with the system. A patient is admitted through the emergency room. The medication record is pulled up and medications are ordered based on what was correct six months ago. There have been changes in the medication by a physician outside of that hospital’s system one month ago. The changed medication may not be related to the current admitting diagnosis. This leads to a medication error called an unintentional med change. It has become quite common since the advent of electronic records.

It is our responsibility as our own health advocates to help the system and ensure our own health and wellbeing. Know your medications, what they are prescribed for, the doses and who prescribed them. Carry an updated list with you all the time, especially if you take multiple medications. Where ever you are seen in the health care continuum, hand over a copy of this list. If you are admitted to the hospital, ask to see the MAR or Medication Administration Record. This is the paper the nurse uses to administer medications as ordered and document them as given. Make sure this matches your list and find out about any changes. Don’t assume that because you have handed over a correct list, that is what will be ordered. Request that your medical record be updated whenever you see errors and request a paper copy of the update.